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Great article, Fran and thanks for the mention!

The 1-way vs 2-way door decision is huge. There was one time I was shipping a change that was a big change to development workflows--essentially preventing any new JS file into the codebase, but it was easily reversible. We could just comment out the line that is adding this form of linting.

Although it was a big change to workflows, it was a small change code-wise and easy to reverse. I was able to use that to argue why we should try it, because we could easily go back if people don't like it.

Comparatively, if it was something that had a high cost of reversal, it would have been a much harder sell

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Thanks for sharing your experience, Jordan!

Most companies embrace agile methodologies, experimenting and failing fast. 2-way door decisions are a good argument to bring because it's speaking in the language of the business. They can understand :)

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Mar 10Liked by Fran Soto

I'm a big fan of the 2-way door decisions. During freelancing, I always felt like an added extra that I could tell the client the what-if scenarios and ensure them that we consider longevity and maintainability when picking our technologies and solutions.

As for data-driven, it depends on what data you rely on: GitHub Star count πŸ˜ƒ, market research, and estimating your potential user base and needs. Then, pick the technology that makes the most sense financially for your case. Because, in the end, it all comes down to finances.

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Thanks, Akos!

Yeah like any metric, you can game it and make an argument for whatever you want :)

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Fran, fantastic insights! I resonate with the principle of quick commitment, yet I’m cautious about irreversible decisions. I prefer to reflect, invoking the deliberate thought Kahneman highlights in β€œThinking, Fast and Slow.” This balanced approach aids in nuanced decision-making.

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Great read, Fran! I think making decisions based on facts and referencing them, saves a lot of back and forth time.

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